[[ download Prime ]] Keeping Score Author Linda Sue Park – Intimatenights.co.uk

Keeping Score This book was pretty good, I liked it because of its plot and how the story moves forward when something happens, something I didn t like is that it was kind of confusing at some points in the book but I feel like it could have been written a bit better I liked that Maggie was helpful even though the other person forgot the name was a Giants fan, because she went for the Dodgers, and she also wasn t mean and still helped the person learnabout baseball and now the person knows how to kee This book was pretty good, I liked it because of its plot and how the story moves forward when something happens, something I didn t like is that it was kind of confusing at some points in the book but I feel like it could have been written a bit better I liked that Maggie was helpful even though the other person forgot the name was a Giants fan, because she went for the Dodgers, and she also wasn t mean and still helped the person learnabout baseball and now the person knows how to keep score and they know what happens during each game When Maggie o was a 9 year old Dodger fan learning to keep score of a baseball game in 1951 Brooklyn, I was a 7 year old Dodger fan not quite ready to keep score of a baseball game in Denver I did learn soon thereafter using pretty much the same symbols Maggie o uses This story s true baseball environment was for me a vivid trip down nostalgia lane. Maggie O loves baseball even though she s a girl and can t play She developes a friendship with the new fireman Jim who teaches Maggie how to score the games Jim gets drafted into the Koren War and Maggie writes him all the time even after Jim stops writing her back War is something Maggie can t wrap her mind around, not the why s and certainly not the people This is a touching story about dealing with War and how it effects people Ms Park puts you right in Brooklyn during the 50 s Maggie Maggie O loves baseball even though she s a girl and can t play She developes a friendship with the new fireman Jim who teaches Maggie how to score the games Jim gets drafted into the Koren War and Maggie writes him all the time even after Jim stops writing her back War is something Maggie can t wrap her mind around, not the why s and certainly not the people This is a touching story about dealing with War and how it effects people Ms Park puts you right in Brooklyn during the 50 s Maggie must face the consequence of war even though she s Thousands of miles away A fantastic and touching story I was attracted to this book because it is historical fiction and has a war theme About 20 pages in, I was ready to give up, because I am certainly not a big sports fan Boy, am I glad I stuck with it It seems to me that there is a spate of children s fiction about WWII that exaggerates the U.S military s role as a force for good, and almost nothing about the many wars that we fought where our role as the good guys was less clear. A wonderful book About baseball,hope, disappointment, and an eternal hope that is way beyond the game. Such a great story read for book club aloud to both my 7 and 9 year olds Great I got on the Korean War and you don t have to be a baseball fan to enjoy it I loved the theme of hope through out the book I loved that Maggie struggled with prayer and whether to not it matters This let to some great conversations with my bigs The mom in the book points out that she doesn t have all the answers and neither do I I think it s good for kids to know grown ups don t know everything and when they gr Such a great story read for book club aloud to both my 7 and 9 year olds Great I got on the Korean War and you don t have to be a baseball fan to enjoy it I loved the theme of hope through out the book I loved that Maggie struggled with prayer and whether to not it matters This let to some great conversations with my bigs The mom in the book points out that she doesn t have all the answers and neither do I I think it s good for kids to know grown ups don t know everything and when they grow up they won t magically have all the answers either 3.5 stars4.0 stars for baseball fansAny true blue sports fan, regardless of team affiliation, has experienced the joy and perhapslikely, the extreme heartache that results from following your favorite team day in and day out For those of us who follow historic teams that have suffered historic losing streaks and near misses i.e the Chicago Cubs, the Boston Red Sox until recently, etc , most of us would probably agree that being a fan requires a special brand of dedication and resilienc 3.5 stars4.0 stars for baseball fansAny true blue sports fan, regardless of team affiliation, has experienced the joy and perhapslikely, the extreme heartache that results from following your favorite team day in and day out For those of us who follow historic teams that have suffered historic losing streaks and near misses i.e the Chicago Cubs, the Boston Red Sox until recently, etc , most of us would probably agree that being a fan requires a special brand of dedication and resilience Ten year old Maggie Fortini meets these requirements.With a name like Maggie o after the New York Yankees all star baseball player, Joe Dimaggio , Maggie was born to be a life long baseball fan In 1950 s New York City, everyone follows one of the city s teams the Brooklyn Dodgers, the New York Yankees, or the New York Giants Maggie s neighborhood is a hard core Dodgers neighborhood Every day after school, she runs home with the sound of the Dodgers radio play by play floating from every window Often, she visits her father s firehouse to listen to Dodgers games with her friends, the firemen Maggie can recite statistics by heart and knows every player, but when a new fireman and Giants fan, Jim Maine, moves to the firehouse, he teaches her the art of scoring games by hand As her older brother keeps reminding her, Maggie is a girl and she can t play ball But by keeping score, Maggie can record every play of every inning, and she feels she s doingthan being a fan she s helping her team.Although they root for different teams, Maggie and Jim bond over their mutual appreciation of the intricacies of the game They keep up their friendship, even after Jim is drafted into the Army and shipped off to fight in the Korean War Maggie and Jim exchange letters regularly until one day, the letters suddenly stop Ultimately, Maggie discovers her difficulties can go beyond who wins the pennant Jim is in trouble and she needs to help her friend The book follows Maggie s efforts to learnabout the world beyond her neighborhood, especially about the Korean War, how to make a difference, and most importantly how to be a friend.I enjoyed Maggie s curiosity, hopefulness, and dedication she wants to do good and she tries all she can to learn about the Korean War and draw her own conclusions, which is difficult for a 10 year old girl in the 1950 s Ms Park excels at recreating the atmosphere and language of a particular historical period in her historical fiction novels she surrounds readers in the sights and sounds of the time so that you can imagine what life was like for a young person in 1950 s Brooklyn I especially appreciated her detailed descriptions of specific baseball games, and I loved that she included her own authentic score sheet for the historic game featured in the book.I was disappointed, however, that Maggie s brother Joey Mick makes several negative comments about Maggie being a girl He implies that since she is a girl, she can t play ball and if she can t play, she can t be a real fan While this was the prevailing view in the 1950 s and Maggie wins Joey Mick s respect in the end, I would prefer this sexism was addressed in a stronger andstraightforward manner in the same way the conflict in Korea was treated in the book.In regards to the criticism that Keeping Score is too baseball centric I felt Ms Park explained the game clearly so that even readers who are unfamiliar with the game can understand the storyline It is evident Ms Park appreciates the finer points of the game by the way she captures the skill in each play In the current era, where the less subtle sports of football and basketball dominate, this was refreshing to me She provided excellent context for understanding what baseball culture was like in 1950 s Brooklyn, but I could understand why some non baseball fans could lose patience with the descriptions.I thought this book was a gem, and it reminded me of days when I listened to Cubs games on the radio on my way home from school and into the night For younger readers, it promotes the values of dedication, knowledge, and friendship Keeping Score exceeded my expectations and addressed muchthan baseball This review also appears on my blog, Read at Home Mom.Though she is a die hard Brooklyn Dodgers fan, just like most of the guys at the firehouse where her father used to work, Maggie can t help but be intrigued by the new guy, Jim Maine, who roots for the Giants and scores all of the games by hand Soon, Maggie is learning to keep score as well, a process which makes her feel especially connected to her beloved Dodgers When Jim is eventually drafted into the army and sent to Korea, Maggie shift This review also appears on my blog, Read at Home Mom.Though she is a die hard Brooklyn Dodgers fan, just like most of the guys at the firehouse where her father used to work, Maggie can t help but be intrigued by the new guy, Jim Maine, who roots for the Giants and scores all of the games by hand Soon, Maggie is learning to keep score as well, a process which makes her feel especially connected to her beloved Dodgers When Jim is eventually drafted into the army and sent to Korea, Maggie shifts from scoring games to scoring the war itself, trying to discern based on what she reads in the newspapers where Jim might be and when it might be time for him to come home When he stops answering her letters, however, Maggie begins to despair, and when she learns what has become of him, she tries everything in her power to help him recover from a terrible experience.I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this story portrayed a faithful Catholic family, and I enjoyed the references early in the book to choosing confirmation names, going to Confession, and going to church Unfortunately, though, it became clear to me as I kept reading that the author had not done enough research on the Catholic Mass prior to Vatican II On page 51, there is the following passage Every week in church, Father John or one of the other priests asked for intercessions, and then everyone prayed for other people Usually, the intercessions were for people who were sick or hurt Or had lost their jobs, or had gone off to Korea to fight in the war.It is true that there is now a part of the Mass where the congregation prays for various intentions like the ones named here, and though it is not usual, there are even some parishes where individuals are asked to call out the specific causes for which they would like to pray But this detail struck me right away as a possible anachronism, because prior to Vatican II, almost none of the Mass was said in the vernacular, and there would have been no opportunity for the congregation to participate so freely I asked in a Catholic forum whether it was at all possible that intercessions such as these would have been included in a 1950s Mass, and the comments all adamantly stated that it would definitely not have happened A few did suggest that perhaps this was happening outside of the Mass, at another weekly church service, but that seems like a reach I will admit that the author did not explicitly say it was happening at Mass, but the details were vague enough that the lack of clarity is as much a problem as the error itself This is disappointing to me, not just because it s an incorrect detail in an otherwise favorable depiction of my religion, but also because of how much research went into the rest of the book The author s note talks a lot about the author s sources for information about baseball and the war, but there is no mention at all of how her depiction of Catholicism came about It is also disconcerting that an editor did not pick up on the error, as it would have been easy enough to ask a Catholic expert, or even just someone who attended Mass during that time period, to fact check the few specific details about the Mass that are included in the story The failure to do so makes it seem like the author did not consider the faith based parts of her story to be as significant as the other storylines.Aside from this problem, the book is decent, but not great The plot is not exactly predictable, but it feels very obvious, and there is never a moment where the reader is really caught off guard or surprised in any way The story is told in a very linear, almost flat fashion, and it attempts to tell a story set over the course of several baseball seasons in the space of only about 200 pages, which makes the pacing feel off and the main character s psychological development feel forced and inauthentic The premise was interesting, but its execution was poor It s just not the author s strongest work, and not a book I plan to revisit for any reason My review is definitely biased, because I don t have the slightest interest in baseball, especially the intricacies of scoring baseball, and sorry, sports fans among my friends I get extremely impatient with people who care deeply about professional sports So it s hard to know whether the meticulous detail about baseball is dull, or if that s just me Leaving that aside, I didn t think this was nearly as polished as some of Park s other books, and it was especially lacking in characterization My review is definitely biased, because I don t have the slightest interest in baseball, especially the intricacies of scoring baseball, and sorry, sports fans among my friends I get extremely impatient with people who care deeply about professional sports So it s hard to know whether the meticulous detail about baseball is dull, or if that s just me Leaving that aside, I didn t think this was nearly as polished as some of Park s other books, and it was especially lacking in characterization Maggie seemed to age hardly at all over the four years the signifiers that she was growing up felt like they were just there to prove it there wasn t corresponding character growth The most interesting character to me was her father, the injured firefighter with a justified paranoia about the dangers of large crowds.The religion stuff was, I thought, the best part of the book Maggie s thoughts were believably those of a young devout Catholic Another reviewer mentioned that it seemed like superstition, and by the end she wasn t sure if Maggie could separate her religious beliefs from baseball superstitions but that is, of course, the point I thought it sort of curious that the religious aspects of the book weren t mentioned at all in the lengthy author s note, or the flap copy, because it s really one of the central themes Both Maggie Fortini and her brother, Joey Mick, were named for baseball great Joe DiMaggio Unlike Joey Mick, Maggie doesn t play baseball but at almost ten years old, she is a dyed in the wool fan of the Brooklyn Dodgers Maggie can recite all the players statistics and understands the subtleties of the game Unfortunately, Jim Maine is a Giants fan, but it s Jim who tea


About the Author: Linda Sue Park

Linda Sue Park is a Korean American author of children s fiction Park published her first novel, Seesaw Girl, in 1999 To date, she has written six children s novels and five picture books for younger readers Park s work achieved prominence when she received the prestigious 2002 Newbery Medal for her novel A Single Shard.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *