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Wuthering Heights You can find the redesigned cover of this edition HEREThis best selling Norton Critical Edition is based on thefirst edition of the novel For the Fourth Edition, the editor has collated thetext with several modern editions and has corrected a number of variants, including accidentals The text is accompanied by entirely new explanatory annotationsNew to the fourth Edition are twelve of Emily Bronte s letters regarding the publication of theedition of Wuthering Heights as well as the evolution of theedition, prose and poetry selections by the author, four reviews of the novel, and poetry selections by the author, four reviews of the novel, and Edward Chitham s insightful and informative chronology of the creative process behind the beloved workFive major critical interpretations of Wuthering Heights are included, three of them new to the Fourth Edition A Stuart Daley considers the importance of chronology in the novel J Hillis Miller examines Wuthering Heights s problems of genre and critical reputation Sandra M Gilbert assesses the role of Victorian Christianity plays in the novel, while Martha Nussbaum traces the novel s romanticism Finally, Lin Haire Sargeant scrutinizes the role of Heathcliff in film adaptations of Wuthering Heights A Chronology and updated Selected Bibliography are also included This is a review I never imagined I d write This is a book I was convinced I d love I just have to face the facts, Emily is no Charlotte.I m going to start with the positives The characterisation of Heathcliff is incredibly strong He is a man who is utterly tormented by the world As a gypsy boy he is dark skinned and dark haired, and to the English this rough, almost wild, look makes him a ruffian He stands up for himself, and bites back thus, he is termed a monster In a very, very, Fran This is a review I never imagined I d write This is a book I was convinced I d love I just have to face the facts, Emily is no Charlotte.I m going to start with the positives The characterisation of Heathcliff is incredibly strong He is a man who is utterly tormented by the world As a gypsy boy he is dark skinned and dark haired, and to the English this rough, almost wild, look makes him a ruffian He stands up for himself, and bites back thus, he is termed a monster In a very, very, Frankenstein s monster like sense, his perceived outer image begins to permeate his soul Call a man a monster, and eventually he may start acting like oneHe s not a rough diamond a pearl containing oyster of a rustic he s a fierce, pitiless, wolfish man He is a very complex man, capable of great cruelty and kindness The world has made him bitter, and in a way ruined him He reaps revenge, but revenge always ends the same way it doesn t solve problems but createsSo he becomes eventormented, this time by his own actions He is very Byronic, and by today s standards a little bit of a bad boy He has all the standard tropes of an anti hero, one that becomes a figure that can be sympathised with and hated He s a very complex man The Bronte s were directly affected by Byron s poetry Rochester is Charlotte s portrayal of a similar, albeit less vengeful, character Love is the key torment in both works Heathcliff has been rejected, as Rochester cannot open his heart because of his secret wife But, rather that overcome his personal loss, and subject the world to his dark and broody personality, Heathcliff actually seeks to do others harm He is a very sensitive man when it comes to his own emotions, though he lacks any real empathy He does not care that he is creatingpain for others He spends his life spreadinghate into the world His only redeeming quality is his love for Catherine, but that doesn t excuse his tyranny He knows how nasty he isShe abandoned her home under a delusion, he answered, picturing in me a hero of romance, and expecting unlimited indulgences from my chivalrous devotion I can hardly regard her in the light of a rational creature, so obstinately has she persisted in forming a fabulous notion of my character and acting on the false impressions she cherished He s so self centred So I rather like his character, well not like but appreciate the complexity, though the novel s structure itself was abysmal I have quite a few problems with the narrative.Why is a servant telling us this story as she speaks to a visitor of her master s house Why are we hearing someone s interpretation of the events rather than the events themselves Why is it twenty years later in the form of an extremely long conversation Why is the servant still actually working for Heathcliff She would have left Nobody would choose to work for such a man It just doesn t make a lot of sense At times it felt like the credibility of the story was stretched to breaking point Nelly the servant actually being in some of the scenes was almost laughable Often it was followed by a terrible explanation attempting to justify her presence It sounded very desperate to me This leads perfectly on to my next point Half way through the story the start of volume ii we are told that the conversation has ended We then hear the visitor s description of the servant s narrative about Heathcliff s life I mean seriously So there are three layers of storytelling Isn t that completely unnecessary and overcomplicated Why not just have Heathcliff tell the story or at the very least have the servant tell the story from start to finish in one story arc with no time shifts For me, it felt like Emily wrote herself into a corner with her choice of narrative and desperately tried to write herself out of it to the point of ridiculousness How much of the story can we believe How much bias is in the narratives Then there was the dialogue overloads Large parts of the novel were entirely conversational The narration was minimalistic and bare The only character whose thoughts we were privy to, again Nelly the servant, was completely irrelevant to the plot Who cares about the servant s emotion and reactions This isn t her story thus, the dialogue was packed out to the point of unnaturalness to fit in the thoughts of characters whose minds we weren t privy to Simply put, the characters said things people wouldn t realistically say in conversation It was overflowing with emotions and private thoughts It was awkward I m not talking about private conversations, those don t happen as Nelly is awkwardly present for every single event, but announcements or decisions that should be internal announced to a group of people This is why plays have asides and soliloquies And this is why novels aren t told from the perspective of a random servant There is clearly a great story here Plot wise the novel is wonderful But the way in which Emily told her story was nothing short of disastrous It felt like a wasted opportunity I m absolutely horrified at how poor it is This novel needed to be taken apart, re wrote, and put back together again Perhaps then it would have been worthy of the story it failed to tell I ve never been so massively underwhelmed in such a blatant lack of skill in a canonised piece of literature, one that has immense critical reception.Facebook Twitter Insta Academia This is my favourite book I do not say that lightly I ve read quite a lot from all different genres but this is my favourite book Of all time Ever The ladies over at The Readventurer kindly allowed me to get my feelings of utter adoration for Wuthering Heights off my chest in their Year of the Classics feature, but I now realise it s time I posted a little something in this blank review space I mean, come on, it s my favourite book so it deserves better than empty nothingness.So, what This is my favourite book I do not say that lightly I ve read quite a lot from all different genres but this is my favourite book Of all time Ever The ladies over at The Readventurer kindly allowed me to get my feelings of utter adoration for Wuthering Heights off my chest in their Year of the Classics feature, but I now realise it s time I posted a little something in this blank review space I mean, come on, it s my favourite book so it deserves better than empty nothingness.So, what do I love so much about Wuthering Heights Everything Okay, maybe not That wouldn t really be saying it strongly enough.What I love about this novel is the setting the wilderness This is not a story about niceties and upper class propriety This is the tale of people who aren t so socially acceptable, who live away from the strict rules of civilization it s almost as if they re not quite from the world we know The isolation of the setting out on the Yorkshire moors between the fictional dwellings of The Heights and Thrushcross Grange emphasises how far removed these characters are from social norms, how unconventional they are, and how lonely they are.This is a novel for readers who can appreciate unlikeable characters readers who don t have to like someone to achieve a certain level of understanding of them and their circumstances People are not born evil so what makes them that way What torments a man so much that he refuses to believe he has any worth What kind of person digs up the grave of their loved one so they can see them once again Heathcliff was not created to be liked or to earn your forgiveness Emily Bront simply tells his story from the abusive and unloved childhood he endured, to his obsession with the only person alive who showed him any real kindness, to his adulthood as an angry, violent man who beats his wife and imprisons the younger Cathy in order to make her marry his son.It would be so easy to hate Heathcliff, and I don t feel that he is some dark, sexy hero like others often do But I appreciate what Emily Bront attempts to teach us about the cycle of violence and aggression Heathcliff eventually becomes littlethan the man he hates By being brought up with beatings and anger he in turn unleashes it on everyone else And Cathy is no delicate flower either What hope did Heathcliff have when the only person he ever loved was so selfish and vindictive But I love Emily Bront for creating such imperfect, screwed up characters.This is a dark novel that deals with some very complicated people, but I think in the end we are offered the possibility of peace and happiness through Cathy younger and Hareton s relationship, and the suggestion that Cathy older and Heathcliff were reunited in the afterlife I had an English teacher in high school that said Cathy and Heathcliff s personalities and their relationship were too much for this world and that peace was only possible for them in the next I have no idea if this was something Ms Bronte intended, but the romantic in me likes to imagine that it s true.Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Youtube I understand why many people hate this book Catherine and Heathcliff are monstrous Monstrous You won t like them because they are unlikable They are irrational, self absorbed, malicious and pretty much any negative quality you can think a person is capable of possessing without imploding They seek and destroy and act with no thought to consequence And I find it fascinating that Emily Bronte chose them to be her central protagonists.When this was first published it was met with animosity be I understand why many people hate this book Catherine and Heathcliff are monstrous Monstrous You won t like them because they are unlikable They are irrational, self absorbed, malicious and pretty much any negative quality you can think a person is capable of possessing without imploding They seek and destroy and act with no thought to consequence And I find it fascinating that Emily Bronte chose them to be her central protagonists.When this was first published it was met with animosity because of how utterly repugnant these two characters were The way they go about their business caring nothing for others but themselves was enough for me to shake my head in complete and total judgment, as if Catherine and Heathcliff could see me and are then effectively shamed by their actions Wuthering Heights is epic, in my humble opinion, because I believe that the scope of this story is monumental Let me explain it is a simple tale between two families that are bound in such a way that their fates are irrevocably linked What affects one, affects the other Its about Catherine and Heathcliff who fall in love and how their relationship ruins the lives of those around them The book, all 400 pages of it, occur almost entirely at Wuthering Heights, the estate of the Earnshaws, and at Thrushcross Grange, the estate of the Lintons with only a couple of miles of land in between.And yet it is not a small story.The emotional magnitude of this book is great and far reaching The provoking and unapologetic quality of Bronte s writing is seductive The process of reading this story can feel so masochistic sometimes that its almost if she s daring us to stop reading and throw the book away Like its a game of personal endurance to see how much we can take, how far we can go She pushes at us, challenging us and all the while knowing that we have to keep reading because redemption awaits It is nothing like its contemporaries The moors, the darkness of the moors, that curses the household of Wuthering Heights and its inhabitants is ever present Nature is personified It is its own character its there, lingering and simmering ever so quietly, saturating every scene with its silent threats of doomokay, I have to stop talking like thiswhat am I any There is poison in this book, but let me ease your mind by saying that it is balanced with goodness also This isn t a perfect novel There were still moments I found myself in perplexion recently invented word And while everything about Catherine and Heathcliff may be corrupt, there is hope in Wuthering Heights If you can journey through the menacing forest of Emily Bronte s imagination, do it because the view is something to behold.Ha ha ha, this reviewwhat even is this I never expected this book to be as flagrantly, unforgivably bad as it was.To start, Bronte s technical choice of narrating the story of the primary characters by having the housekeeper explain everything to a tenant 20 years after it happened completely kills suspense and intimacy The most I can say is that to some extent this functions as a device to help shroud the story and motives from the reader But really, at the time literary technique hadn t quite always gotten around to accepting tha I never expected this book to be as flagrantly, unforgivably bad as it was.To start, Bronte s technical choice of narrating the story of the primary characters by having the housekeeper explain everything to a tenant 20 years after it happened completely kills suspense and intimacy The most I can say is that to some extent this functions as a device to help shroud the story and motives from the reader But really, at the time literary technique hadn t quite always gotten around to accepting that omnipotent 3rd person narrators are allowed, so you d have to have a multiperspective story told by an omnipotent 3rd person narrator who was actually a character in the story e.g the housekeeper Ellen The layers of perspective make it annoying and sometimes impossible to figure out who is telling what bit of story and over, because so much is related as two characters explaining things between themselves, the result is that we rarely see any action, and instead have the entire book explained in socratic, pedantic exposition.The sense of place is poorly rendered and almost entirely missing Great, the moor is gray.But ultimately, the most damning thing is that the characters are a bunch of immature, insuffrable, narcissistic assholes with very little self respect This isn t a story of great love and passion It s the story of how child abuse perpetuates itself through the generations The characters are either emotionally abused as children or, as in the case of Cathy I, they re spoiled and overindulged with no discipline and can t muster the restraint and self respect to ditch abusive relationships I kept waiting for any of the characters to be remotely worth my time, but I found no respite from the brutish abuse of the horribly twisted Heathcliff or from the simpering idiocy of Cathy I and II Ugh Not only are there no transformations or growth, but the characters aren t even that likable to begin with How this book got to be a classic is beyond me

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